New Course Proposals ’15-’16

New Course Proposals ’15-’16

Academic Programs

PEHR 3400: Activity Programming for Special Populations
A comprehensive look at providing high-quality fitness, physical education, sport, and outdoor adventure experiences for individuals with disabilities. Students will learn best practices and applications for inclusion in classroom settings, as well as discover how to develop individualized fitness, competitive sport, and outdoor adventure experiences for individuals with special needs.

More Info

Syllabus


PEHR 3350: Motor Learning & Development
A study of how the development of physiological, perceptual, neurological, intellectual, and emotional factors affect motor learning. Knowledge from this course provides a framework for the establishment of programs that facilitate skill acquisition for all learners with a focus on children and adolescents.

More Info

Syllabus


PEHR: 4900 Theories & Techniques for Teaching Fitness and Motor Skills
Content in this course will prepare students to design and implement quality physical education programs for elementary and secondary school students. In addition to developing the knowledge and skills to select and implement developmentally appropriate activities for children/adolescents, students enrolled in the course will also develop an understanding of curriculum design, public school policy and procedures (as related to P.E.), as well as national standards and guidelines affecting physical education programming.

More Info

Syllabus

ACTIVITY PROGRAMS

PEHR 1105: Badminton & Pington
Two lifetime sports will be taught in this course. Both Badminton and Pington are played on a net using slightly different shuttlecocks. Badminton is played with a racquet, while Pington is played with a wooden paddle. The course is taught with the intent of students developing a lifetime leisure and social activity that will give hours of enjoyment as a family, social, and/or competitive activity.

Syllabus


PEHR 1125: Pickleball
Pickleball is a game similar to tennis, but played on a smaller court with a wiffleball and wooden or composite paddles. It is arguably easier to establish basic skills than tennis; however, the game can become very competitive among advanced players. The course is taught with the intent of students developing a lifetime leisure and social activity that will give hours of enjoyment as a family, social, and/or competitive activity.

Syllabus